Pain Relief

Pain can occur in many areas of the body and there are multiple types of pain. This section is meant for acute pain (sudden onset and short term). To read about all of the different types of pain please click here. If your physician has prescribed an over-the-counter medication for chronic pain, you will most certainly find what you need on this page as well. 

Headache | Sinus Pain | Arthritis | Dental Pain | Back Pain | Knee and Wrist Pain | Hip Pain | Muscle Pain | Abdominal Pain 

Over the Counter options and pain:

Click on type of pain to get more information! 

Headache

Not all headaches require a doctor's attention. But sometimes headaches warn of a more serious disorder. Let your health care provider know if you have sudden, severe headaches. Get medical help right away if you have a headache after a blow to your head, headache at the top of your head or if you have a headache along with a stiff neck, fever, confusion, loss of consciousness, or pain in the eye or ear. 

1) Ice pack 

2) Tylenol (Acetaminophen)

3) Motrin, Aleve, Advil, Ibuprofen, Naproxen (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

4) Excedrin/Excedrine Migraine  (Contains aspirin, acetaminophen and caffeine) 

 
 

Arthritis pain (osteoarthritis)

1) Tylenol Arthritis (8hr): 650mg by mouth every 8 hours

(NOTE: Taking tylenol around the clock ie. every 8 hours works better and safer than taking an NSAID for arthritis pain relief)

2) Aleve (naproxen), Advil and Motrin (ibuprofen) (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

 

Dental pain

The source of tooth pain may be dental decay, an injury or an infection in the tooth. Regardless of the cause, if you have ongoing pain it’s time to see a dentist or endodontist for treatment. In the meantime, read here for information on common pain symptoms, possible causes and some steps you can take to ease the discomfort. The following are for short term relief of dental pain until seen by dentist

1) Orajel topical

2) Anbesol topical

3) Motrin, Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (Naproxen): Helps with inflammation and pain(NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

4) Tylenol (acetaminophen)

 

Sinus pain

***Most colds that cause sinus pain are viral but see a health care provider if no relief in 10-14 days, or symptoms are worse after 7 days as this may be bacterial and require antibiotics or sinus pain is not due to common cold***

1) Saline nasal spray to clean out sinuses

2) Humidifier to help break up mucus in the sinuses

3) Warm compress on sinuses 

4) Afrin nasal spray (LIMIT to 3 DAYS use to prevent rebound congestion)

5) Decongestants: Sudafed PE or purchase Sudafed behind the pharmacy counter

6) Tylenol (acetaminophen)

7) Motrin, Advil, Ibuprofen, Aleve, Naproxen (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

 

All items listed in this section are also indicated for muscle pain 

Back pain and Muscle Pain

  • Signs and symptoms of back pain may include: Muscle ache, shooting or stabbing pain, pain that radiates down your leg, limited flexibility or range of motion of the back

  • When to seek medical attention: Most back pain gradually improves with home treatment and self-care, usually within two weeks. If not, see your doctor.

In rare cases, back pain can signal a serious medical problem. Seek immediate care if your back painCauses new bowel or bladder problems, is accompanied by fever, follows a fall, blow to your back or other injury

  • Contact a doctor if your back pain: Is severe and doesn't improve with rest, spreads down one or both legs, especially if the pain extends below the knee causes weakness, numbness or tingling in one or both legs, is accompanied by unexplained weight loss.

  • Also, see your doctor if you start having back pain for the first time after age 50, or if you have a history of cancer, osteoporosis, steroid use, or drug or alcohol abuse.

1) Lidocaine 4% Patch NOTE: May wear up to 12 hours then 12 hours off before applying new patch

2) BioFreeze/Bengay/IcyHot Ointments

3) Tylenol (acetaminophen)

4) Motrin, Advil, Ibuprofen, Aleve, Naproxen (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

5) Heating Pad

 

All Items listed with back pain (above) are also indicated for muscle pain

 

Muscle pain

The most common causes of muscle pain are tension, stress, overuse and minor injuries. This type of pain is usually localized, affecting just a few muscles or a small part of your body.

Systemic muscle pain — pain throughout your whole body — is more often the result of an infection, an illness or a side effect of a medication

Typical self care: 

Muscle pain that occurs during an activity usually signals a "pulled" or strained muscle. These types of injuries usually respond well to R.I.C.E. therapy:

Rest. Take a break from your normal activities.

Ice. Place an ice pack or bag of frozen peas on the sore area for 20 minutes several times a day.

Compression. Use a compression bandage to reduce swelling.

Elevation. Elevate your foot to help reduce swelling.

Muscle pain from minor injuries, stress or exercise is usually helped with simple home treatment. Muscle pain from severe injuries or systemic disease is often serious and requires medical care.

Get immediate medical care if you have muscle pain with: Trouble breathing or dizziness, extreme muscle weakness, a high fever and stiff neck

Schedule an office visit if you haveA known tick bite or could have had a tick bite, a rash, especially the "bulls-eye" rash of Lyme disease

Muscle pain, especially in your calves, that occurs with exercise and resolves with rest, signs of infection, such as redness and swelling, around a sore muscle, muscle pain after you start taking or increase the dosage of a medication — (particularly statins — medications used to control cholesterol), and muscle pain that doesn't improve with self-care

 

1) Ice pack 

2) Heating pad 

3) Biofreeze/Bengay/IcyHot

4) Lidocaine Patches 

5) Tylenol

6) Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen, Aleve, Naproxen (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

All Muscle Pain Products are here

 

Knee and wrist pain

***Contact a doctor if: Can't bear weight on your knee, have marked knee swelling, are unable to fully extend or flex your knee, see an obvious deformity in your leg or knee, have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee feel as if your knee is unstable or your knee "gives out"

 

Not all wrist pain requires medical care. Minor sprains and strains usually respond to ice, rest and over-the-counter pain medications. But if pain and swelling last longer than a few days or become worse, see your doctor. Delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to poor healing, reduced range of motion and long-term disability.***

1) Knee brace 

2) Wrist brace 

3) Tylenol (acetaminophen)

4) Motrin, Advil, Ibuprofen, Aleve, Naproxen (NOTE: these medications are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory NSAID's which can exacerbate certain health conditions like high blood pressure, kidney disease and can increase risk of bleed, including gastrointestinal if on a prescription medications that prevent stroke or blood clot; please be sure primary physician is aware of NSAID use)

 

Hip pain

Hip pain out of the realm of over the counter treatment unless it is caused by osteoarthritis pain, if so, see arthritis section. Please click the title or here to find out more about hip pain and treatment options.